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BP returns for more profits and pollution

By: 
John Bell

November 23, 2011

BP has filed applications to drill new deep-water wells in the Gulf of Mexico. The applications came just one week after a US government report confirmed what the whole world already knows: that BP was “ultimately responsible” for the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig which killed 11 workers and resulted in over 5 million barrels of oil fouling the Gulf.

US environmental groups are appalled by the timing, and are seeking to block BP through the courts.

BP is anxious to get going, as the Macondo oil field was its most profitable operation. Its rivals have been pumping the region while it was forced to sit out.

Cynically, BP proposes to use future Gulf profits to pay into the $20 billion fund, mandated by the White House, to clean up the oil still washing up on beaches throughout the region.

Meanwhile, aerial photographs show that a massive oil slick is resurfacing in the area of the Macondo spill, raising two possibilities: either attempts to disburse the oil using chemicals (just as toxic as the oil itself) have failed, or attempts to cap the well itself failed and leaking continues.

Analysis of surface oil samples from the region done by scientists from Louisiana State University proved them chemically identical to oil from the BP well. They believe that the well is still leaking and call on the government to check.

The US Coast Guard insists it has not seen any new oil slicks. USCG officials suggest the new oil samples are “natural seepage, or a burp out of the wreckage down below.” BP concurs. Based on experience of the past year and-a-half, both are lying.

Meanwhile, new studies reveal that, far from returning to normal, Gulf spawning grounds remain toxic and fish are exhibiting a wide range of health problems and deformities.

Scientists expect many other species, including commercially important snappers, shrimp and oysters will suffer chronic illness that shortens their lives and lowers their ability to reproduce.

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